Forever Remain

ROXTON LETTERS VOLUME TWO

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A Companion to the Roxton Family Saga

This second volume of previously unpublished letters from the private correspondence of the Roxton family spans a twenty-year period, from the 1760s to the late 1780s, and includes extracts from the diaries of Antonia, Duchess of Kinross, and her younger son Lord Henri-Antoine Hesham. Also included are letters by the 5th Duke of Roxton, written in the final stages of his illness, and addressed to his youngest son Lord Henri-Antoine. The volume concludes with a letter by the latter’s wife, Lady Henri-Antoine Hesham, to her mother-in-law, the Duchess of Kinross, while abroad on her bridal trip. These letters complement the later chronology of the award-winning Roxton Family Saga: Dair Devil, Proud Mary, and Satyr’s Son. With a foreword by a late-Victorian descendant, Alice-Victoria, 10th Duchess of Roxton.

Audiobook performed by Alex Wyndham

Letters and diary entries
Non explicit (mild violence)
Novellla (41,000 words)


I get Lucinda Brant. We are both diehard romantics at heart. When I first started reading Eternally Yours the first volume of Roxton letters, I was unsure how a bunch of letters would hold my interest. I should never have doubted Lucinda Brant. Eternally Yours was magical. FOREVER REMAIN brings us into the world of the sixth duke, his duchess and their dynasty. A bold exciting look into the lives of the Roxton family told through a litany of personal letters which is like listening into their conversations. Each letter which truly feels like a personal chat, uncovers information that was not included in the previous books about this family or answers questions about people or circumstances mentioned in the saga. Lord Henri-Antoine quickly became one of my favorite Roxton characters in Satyrs Son. I truly loved this story about misguided fraternity brothers and the realization of caring and friendship that prevailed. And of course when love came into the picture life was never going to be the same. So when I realized that so many letters of FOREVER REMAIN referred to Henri-Antoine as a young boy and then onto adulthood and ultimate marriage well I was of course hooked. Once again, Lucinda Brant has shown us why she is an undisputed master of this genre.
★★★★★ Top Pick
SWurman, Night Owl Reviews

 

 

The Highly acclaimed Roxton Family Saga

 

 

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Excerpt

FROM LETTER TWENTY-EIGHT

Lady Henri-Antoine Hesham to Her Grace the Most Noble Duchess of Kinross, Leven Castle via Kinross, Fife, Scotland.

[Translated from the French.]

The White House on Third Hill, Constantinople,
August 12, 1787

Dear Maman-Duchess,


I trust this letter finds you, Papa-Kinross, and Elsie in the best of good health.


Before I write anything else, I, we, thank you from the bottom of our hearts for the truly special and touching gift you sent to help us celebrate the first anniversary of our marriage. I can hardly believe it is thirteen months to the day since my life changed forever. The months have gone by too quickly, but each one has been more magical than the last, and you know from our letters how very happy we are.


Your gift arrived only two days ago, so it was indeed a wonderful surprise! Neither of us had any expectations of what it could be, though Henri-Antoine knew immediately he removed the wooden box from its crate and shed its wrappings. He set the box on the low table before us, and it was well we were seated on cushions and just inches from the ground because he swayed and grabbed the table edge. You can imagine I thought he was unwell, but he assured me he was not. Before he opened the lid, he gently ran his fingers over the box’s polished surface in the same manner I have seen him do when calming a frightened dog or petting a cat, as if the object had life and was a treasured pet. And when he slowly opened it out to reveal the inlaid interior and the playing pieces and cups within, there were tears in his eyes. He was so overcome that I remained silent, yet could hardly wait for him to tell me the significance of this playing box, and most particularly its special significance for him.


When he told me that this was the very backgammon board you and his father played on every day of your married life, I, too, was overcome, and remained speechless. He told me in a shaking voice how he would watch you both from the chaise longue, and how he often felt an intruder because when you played at backgammon you forgot everyone else and it was as if it was just the two of you in the library. But he also told me that it was you who taught him how to play. And he recalled the day he won his first game from his father, and his father’s look of incredulity that his eight-year-old son had beaten him at his own game. That memory had Henri-Antoine grinning. Though he then was incredulous himself that you had parted with this most treasured and loved item.


But I understand why you did, and you know, do you not, Maman-Duchess, that we will cherish this as you do, and always will. Henri-Antoine has already written to thank you, and no doubt he told you I am a complete novice at the game. Though I am certain you knew this was so. We have decided that we will honor your gift by playing each evening, while having our Turkish coffee. I am very willing to learn, and Henri-Antoine is already proving a patient if exacting teacher. I have a plan to improve my game so that he will be more than a little surprised…

[The letter continues in Forever Remain.]